Generic #domains as trademarks: Sneakers.com and Permit.com at the #USPTO

Once SCOTUS delivered a green light decision on the Booking.com trademark application, many generic domain registrants rushed to file for similar trademarks at the USPTO.

Generic domain names are being applied for as matching trademarks – with the TLD included. We’ve been reporting on these trademark applications for the past two months, and there’s always a new domain that hits the USPTO database.

Today’s applications involve the generic domains Sneakers.com and Permit.com.

Domains, brands and trademarks. Photo by Amador Loureiro on Unsplash

The application for the Sneakers.com trademark was filed by 1661 Inc. in Los Angeles, California, with an “intent to use” clause. In other words, the mark is not yet in use, but it will be for the following products and services:

Providing online retail store services and retail store services in the field of clothing, clothing accessories, headwear, jewelry, footwear and shoe cleaning and deodorizing preparations; Advertising and promotional services; Advertising and marketing services, namely, promoting the goods of others in the nature of clothing, clothing accessories, jewelry, footwear and shoe cleaning and deodorizing preparations; Electronic commerce services, namely, providing information about clothing, clothing accessories, jewelry, footwear and shoe cleaning and deodorizing preparations via telecommunication networks for advertising and sales purposes; Providing an online searchable database featuring product information about the goods of others for the purpose of selecting, reviewing and categorizing clothing, clothing accessories, jewelry, footwear and shoe cleaning and deodorizing preparations to meet consumer’s specifications; Customer loyalty rewards program for shoppers for commercial, promotional or advertising purposes; Promotion of goods and services through sponsorship of events

Registered in 2000, Sneakers.com has no records of a sale at NameBio. In 2017, it featured a sneaker store. It’s quite possibly sold.

So who is 1661 Inc.? Doing business as GOAT, and operating from GOAT.com, the company offers sneakers and other footwear products.

The application for the Permit.com trademark is twofold. One is for a graphic mark that incorporates a symbol, and the other is for a standard character mark.

The applicant, Wisconsin based State Permits, Inc., claims first use of the mark to be as early as in 2010, and for the following services:

Obtaining entitlements, namely, government and regulatory permits, licenses and approvals, to build subdivisions, residential and/or commercial structures for others

In the coming months, we’ll know how many of these applications make the cut and become registered trademarks, despite the generic keywords involved.

Copyright © 2022 DomainGang.com · All Rights Reserved.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

 characters available